Title

The Different Between Fresh and Frozen Strawberries

Broad Question

If people can tell the differents between Fresh and Frozen foods

Specific Question


What percent of subjects can tell which type of frozen strawberry they tasted?

Hypothesis

It is Hypothesis that 12 out of the 20 subjects will be able to tell the difference between the types of strawberries

Graph of Hypothesis

jake12-bHypograph.jpg



Variables

Independent Variable:

Frozen Time

Dependent Variable:

The percent of subjects that can tell which strawberry is which.

Controlled Variable:

Knife

Cups
Brand of Fresh Strawberries
Brand of Frozen Strawberries
Cutting Broad
Science Room
Bag That I Kept the Fresh Strawberries in
Bag That I Kept the Frozen Strawberries in
People That Tasted Both Strawberries
Freezer




General Plan


Potential Problems And Solutions

Taking the strawberries out at the same time - take them out at the same time at my house
Having both types of strawberries in the same cups - pay enough

Safety Or Environmental Concerns

Choking
Allergies

Experimental Design


The experiment was conducted to test if kids in 7th and 8th grade can tell the difference between fresh frozen strawberries and store frozen strawberries. The fresh strawberries were bought, cut, put in a ziplock bag, and frozen for 4 weeks. Ten strawberries from each type of strawberry was cut in half to make it twenty strawberries, which were place in cups. On the day of the experiment twenty subjects tasted each type of strawberry. The subjects wrote down on a piece of paper which type is which and they had to check off which type of strawberry they liked better. After the subjects finished doing the experiment the mean was calculated to determine if the subjects could tell the difference between the two types of strawberries.

Resources and Budget Table

Item
Number needed
Where I will get this
Cost
Fresh Strawberries
15
Hannaford
$4.98
Frozen Strawberries
15
Walmart
$3.49
Dixie Cups
20
Walmart
$2.98
Knife
1
Borrowed

Cutting Board
1
Borrowed

Freezer
1
At my house
$1,529.10
Strainer
1
Borrowed

Sink
1
Borrowed





Detailed Procedure



Procedure:

Take pictures of all steps


  1. Drive to Hannaford.
  2. At Hannaford get Fresh Strawberries (3 ounces) that are from Florida pay for them, go home.
  3. Go into the kitchen.
  4. Wash the Strawberries that are from Hannaford with water, then cut the leafs off the Fresh Frozen Strawberries.
  5. Put all the Fresh Frozen Strawberries that you cut off the leafs and put them in a glad ziploc bag.
  6. Put the glad bag full of Strawberries in the freezer for four weeks. For now on they will be called Fresh Frozen Strawberries.
  7. Go to school and hand out permission slips to a total of 30 people.
  8. Three weeks later get Frozen Strawberries from Walmart bring them home and put them. For this point on these Strawberries will be called Store Frozen Strawberries.
  9. Go to school in the morning and collect the permission slips and get 20 people to participate in the experiment.
  10. After the four weeks are up take the Fresh Frozen Strawberries out of the freezer and the Store Frozen Strawberries out of the freezor.
  11. Bring both types of strawberries into school.
  12. Bring in a knife and a cutting board.
  13. Put them down on a table in Mr. Yahna room.
  14. On the same table make 20 dixie cups that have an “A” on them and make 20 dixie cups that have a “B” on them with a sharpy.
  15. Cut both types of strawberries on the cutting board with the knife that I brought in.
  16. Cut them into a half vertically, on the same table.
  17. Put one half of a Fresh Frozen Strawberry in all the 20 “A” cups and put one half of the Store Frozen Strawberries in all the “B” cups.
  18. Cut 10 pieces of copy paper in half that will make 20 piece of paper.
  19. On papers make a table with a chart that has an “A” and a ”B” column and one more column so the subjects can write which one they like better.
  20. Have the 20 people eat one of the Fresh Frozen Strawberry, have the subjects wait 30 seconds “now you can eat” then have them eat the Store Frozen Strawberry.
  21. Write on the chart which type is which if they could tell
  22. Check the box that like column for which type of strawberry the subject likes better.
  23. Collected the papers




Data Table


aajamie_html_5024b994.jpg





Data Analysis


Graphs


jake12-bsubject graph.jpg


jake12-bmeangraphuse.png


Photos

jake12-beatastrawberry2
Eating Strawberry


jake12-bsetup2
Both Types of Strawberries


Results

More people could correctly the strawberries. In this experiment the results show that 12 subjects were correct in choosing which strawberry was which and 8 subjects were incorrect. 60% of the subjects could identify the strawberries correctly and 40% could not identify the strawberries correctly.

Conclusion

The experiment was designed to test if subjects in middle school can tell the difference between fresh and frozen strawberries. The results show that 60% of students in middle school could tell the difference between each strawberry. The average was 0.6 students.

Discussion

The experiment question was, what percent of subjects can tell which type of frozen strawberry they tasted? The results of the experiment showed that subjects were able to tell the differences between fresh frozen and factory frozen. It was hypothesized that 60% of test subjects would be able to tell the difference between the two types of strawberries. The test results supported the hypothesis. More people could correctly identify the strawberries. In this experiment the results show that 12 subjects were correct in choosing which strawberry was which and 8 subjects were incorrect. 60% of the subjects could identify the strawberries correctly and 40% could not identify the strawberries correctly.
As trials were conducted it was not clear immediately if subjects would support the hypothesis. The mean graph did not show the results as clearly as the bar graph. This is because the mean graph represented correct guesses. The subjects tasted strawberries before and that helped them figure out which one was which. It was found that a study took place about meat not strawberries to see if people could tell the difference between frozen meat and not frozen meat. It was found that people could tell the difference between the two meats. The results can be explained though this experiment. A problem that went wrong was that the fresh frozen strawberries started to get mushy before all 20 subjects could taste them. The experiment design and operation did not change as the experiment was run. To make the results better instead of 20 subjects the experiment could have involved 21 subjects or more. A camera was used throughout this experiment. Restaurant can use this information because now they know that people in the restaurants can tell the quality of the food and restaurants can know what people like better. Companies may try to freeze other fruits so they're available year round. Other questions are if other fruits and vegetables can be frozen to have the nutrients stay in the foods.


Background Research

Strawberries are sprawling plants. Seedlings will send out runners, or ‘daughter’ plants, which in turn will send out their own runners.

pH should be between 5.5 and 7. If necessary, amend your soil in advance.

Strawberries require 6-10 hours a day of direct sunlight, so choose your planting site accordingly.

You're both right. It's true that fresh fruit and vegetables tend to taste better and have more nutritional value than frozen or canned. But that's not always the case.

To help retain the highest levels of vitamin C, don't thaw frozen veggies before cooking. Studies show that vegetables cooked directly from frozen retain more vitamin C than vegetables that are thawed first.

Fresh is best when it really is farm-fresh and ripe. But many commercial fruits and veggies are picked before peak ripeness -- which also means before their nutritional peak -- to avoid spoilage during transport and storage. And just a few days after harvest, fruits and vegetables begin to lose some of their nutritive goodness. What's more, the longer they sit on the shelf -- during transport, in the supermarket, and in your fridge -- the fewer nutrients they have left to pass on to you.

Ideally, by the end of the school year, students should have had
the opportunity to try at least one food from each of the food
groups: whole grains, fruits, vegetables, protein and low-fat/fatfree milk products. Provide many opportunities through different taste testing events to try different foods. It is more effective to
conduct taste test events with only two or three food items at a
time, rather than offering five or more items.

Believe it or not, frozen foods aren’t all bad for you—sometimes they’re the best in-a-pinch options available.

While canned vegetables tend to lose a lot of nutrients during the preservation process (notable exceptions include tomatoes and pumpkin), frozen vegetables may be even more healthful than some of the fresh produce sold in supermarkets, says Gene Lester, Ph.D., a plant physiologist at the USDA Agricultural Research Center in Weslaco, Texas

Fruits and vegetables chosen for freezing tend to be processed at their peak ripeness, a time when—as a general rule—they are most nutrient-packed.

Photo Credit frozen strawberries image by João Freitas from Fotolia.com
Fresh food is naturally better for you, but if the food has been picked before it is ripe

Some frozen foods have been picked at their peak, thus allowing it to be nutrient packed. Most food loses its nutrients when handled and processed for retail.

Fresh, ripe foods taste better than frozen, pre-ripe foods. Some frozen foods are picked before they are ripe and never develop full nutritional value, which can affect the taste as well. Raw meats are not affected at all by the freezing process, but uncooked meat does better in the freezer than cooked meat. Uncooked meat such as chicken and wild game can last in the freezer from eight to 11 months, according to the United States Department of Agriculture.

Sometimes frozen foods are a better choice than fresh, such as in cases of food outbreaks and when there is a shortage of fresh food. In general, frozen fruits and vegetables are less expensive than fresh ones during winter months. The freezing process slows enzymatic activity which leads to deterioration and inactivates bacteria and microorganisms that are naturally found on certain foods when stored at 0 degrees Fahrenheit, according to the USDA. Whether fruits and vegetables are fresh, frozen are canned, any of these varieties are better than nothing at all.

Freezing is a handy way of preserving many different kinds of food products. Food decomposes much more slowly when frozen. Yet, most of us are easily able to tell the difference between a fresh food item and its frozen alternative. Here we explore these differences, with a comparative study of fresh-versus-frozen foods.

Fresh strawberries are a healthy addition to any diet. The health value of frozen strawberries depends on the type you choose. Unsweetened frozen strawberries provide many of the same nutrients as fresh and their benefits are available year-round; however, sweetened versions may add too much sugar to your diet.

In 1998, the Food & Drug Administration (FDA) confirmed that frozen fruits and vegetables provide the same essential nutrients and health benefits as fresh. It's no wonder. Frozen fruits and vegetables are nothing more than fresh fruits and vegetables that have been blanched (cooked for a short time in boiling water or steamed) and frozen within hours of being picked. Further, frozen fruits and vegetables are processed at their peak in terms of freshness and nutrition.What's not to like?

The idea is to focus on getting MORE fruits and vegetables in your diet. Fresh, frozen, diced, sliced, steamed, raw, whatever. You just want more. In fact, starting in March of 2007, the CDC and the Produce for Better Health Foundation are launching a national campaign with the slogan, "Fruits & Veggies -- More Matters."
The new message replaces the old "Five a Day" campaign, which dates back to the early 1990s. Why? Because five servings of fruits and vegetables is just not enough. Adults need anywhere from seven to 13 cups of produce daily to reap all the health benefits of fruits and vegetables. So, more really does matter.



References

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"Fresh Food vs. Frozen Food | Education.com." Education.com | An Education & Child Development Site for Parents | Parenting & Educational Resource. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Mar. 2013. <http://www.education.com/science-fair/article/fresh-food-frozen-food/>.

"Frozen Food Nutrients Vs. Fresh Food Nutrients | LIVESTRONG.COM."LIVESTRONG.COM - Lose Weight & Get Fit with Diet, Nutrition & Fitness Tools | LIVESTRONG.COM. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Mar. 2013. <http://www.livestrong.com/article/360594-frozen-food-nutrients-vs-fresh-food-nutrients/#ixzz2JIjmht1s>.

"Frozen Food Nutrients Vs. Fresh Food Nutrients | LIVESTRONG.COM."LIVESTRONG.COM - Lose Weight & Get Fit with Diet, Nutrition & Fitness Tools | LIVESTRONG.COM. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Mar. 2013. <http://www.livestrong.com/article/360594-frozen-food-nutrients-vs-fresh-food-nutrients/#ixzz2JIkKTa55
>.

"Search." Nutrition Advice by Registered Dietitians - HealthCastle.com | . N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Mar. 2013. <http://www.healthcastle.com/veggies_fresh_frozen.shtml>.

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>.

"almanac." www.almanac.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Mar. 2013. <www.almanac.com/plant/strawberries>.

"eatingwell." www.eatingwell.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Mar. 2013. <www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/fresh_vs_frozen_vegetables_are_we_giving_up_nutrition_fo
>.

"livestrong." /www.livestrong.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Mar. 2013. <http://www.livestrong.com/article/361206-are-frozen-strawberries-healthy/#ixzz2JVsIH1Qy>.

"womansday." www.womansday.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Mar. 2013. <www.womansday.com/food-recipes/wd-taste-test-healthy-frozen-entrees-104893__>.

Abstract


An experiment was conducted to determine if subjects in the 7th and 8th grade can tell the difference between store frozen strawberries and fresh frozen strawberries by the sense of taste. It was hypothesized that 12 out of the 20 subjects will be able to tell the difference between the types of strawberries. The experiment was run with 20 subjects to taste both types of strawberries, after the subjects tasted the strawberries the subjects wrote down which one was which. The average was 12 out of 20 subjects could tell the difference between the two types of strawberries. The results show that subjects in the 7th and 8th grade can tell the difference between the strawberries.